Public Rights of Way – Rossett

public footpath

Around the Rossett area Rights of Way (PROW) or Footpath Routes are generally kept in a good condition, this includes the associated Kissing Gates, Stiles, etc. However on occasions you may find broken stiles, blocked footpaths or litter on these routes. It is unlikely that the council dept responsible for the maintenance of these PROW will become aware of issues unless they are reported by members of the public who use the routes.

Interactive Map

Click on the ‘box with arrow’ icon to change map type or select a particular Parish area.

The above map shows all the footpaths in the Rossett Area (including those of the adjacent Cheshire Parish of Pulford) The naming convention of footpaths is done along the old Parish nomenclature namely: Allington, Burton, Llay, Gresford, Bieston, Higher Kinnerton, Holt, Marford and Hoseley. Clicking on a footpath route will bring up details of the footpath including its name.

Reporting Issues with a PROW in the Rossett Area

For footpaths (PROW) problems within the Wrexham CBC boundary you will need to have the footpath reference number (obtained from the above map) and fill in the on-line Complaint Form. There is also a printable version which can be used if you want to append any photographs which can be emailed to rightsofway@wrexham.gov.uk

For Cheshire West and Chester problems can also be reported online.

Local authorities

…have a primary responsibility for public rights of way in their areas. Their key duties include:

  • maintenance
  • preventing obstruction
  • maintaining a legal record of rights of way

Obligations of Land Owners

If you own or maintain land on which there is a public right of way, you are responsible for keeping it accessible and useable. This will generally include a duty to:

  • Not Obstruct the Right of Way 
  • Ensure that any brambles / hedgerows etc are kept cut back to enable access
  • Ensure that any hazards (such as electric fences) are clearly marked as such and steps are taken to ensure that members of the public can still pass safely.

In particular, land owners must:

  • Maintain any stiles/gates
  • Cut back overgrowing vegetation
  • Not obstruct use of the land
  • Only use pesticides approved for use on a right of way/open access land
  • Not keep any dairy bulls over 10 months old in a field with a right of way / open access to the public

If you encounter a problem with a right of way being obstructed or impassable, you should report it to your local highway authority. If you are in woodland, you may also contact the Forestry Commission. If you are in a National Park, you can contact the National Park Authority.